Article Tools
Email this article (Login required)
Email the author (Login required)
About The Authors

Adedotun Temitope Adegoke
Olabisi Onabanjo University
Nigeria

Babajide Emmanuel Olowu
Department of Crop Production, College of Agricultural Sciences/ Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State
Nigeria

Nurudeen Samuel Lawal
Department of Agricultural Engineering, College of Engineering and Environmental studies / Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State
Nigeria

Olubunmi Abosede Odusanya
Department of Crop Production, College of Agricultural Sciences/ Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State
Nigeria

Oluseun Bamidele Banjo
Department of Crop Production, College of Agricultural Sciences/ Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State
Nigeria

Oluwafemi Babatunde Oduntan
Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries, College of Agricultural Sciences/ Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State
Nigeria

Babasola Dapo Odugbose
Department of Agricultural Engineering, College of Engineering and Environmental studies / Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State
Nigeria

User
Information for Author
Indexed By








Visitor Statistic

The impact of cassava wastewater from wet fufu paste processors on surrounding soils: a case study of Ayetoro, Ogun State, Nigeria

Adedotun Temitope Adegoke, Babajide Emmanuel Olowu, Nurudeen Samuel Lawal, Olubunmi Abosede Odusanya, Oluseun Bamidele Banjo, Oluwafemi Babatunde Oduntan, Babasola Dapo Odugbose
  J. Degrade. Min. Land Manage. , pp. 2319-2326  
Viewed : 82 times

Abstract


Cassava effluent has become a subject of growing environmental concern in developing countries largely due to ineffective disposal methods. In this study, the impact of land disposal technique by processors in Ayetoro, Ogun State Nigeria was investigated. Soil samples were collected from three disposal sites scattered across the study area at depths of 0 cm, 15 cm, 30 cm and 45 cm. Results were compared with samples obtained from control sites at a distance of 5 m from the disposal sites. The physicochemical parameters determined includes soil pH, silt, sand, clay, organic carbon, exchangeability acid, pH, total nitrogen, average phosphorous, zinc, lead, iron, sodium, copper, calcium, potassium, magnesium and manganese. The result show that the pH varies significantly across the sites. The highest concentration was recorded for phosphorous while the lowest concentration was obtained for total nitrogen. The highest concentrations were recorded at the soil surface while the lowest were recorded at 45 cm depth. Idagba recorded the highest pollutant concentration and while the lowest were obtained at kano. The activities and discharge techniques of processors had negatively impacted the soil quality which may also affect the ground water quality. There is a need to take proactive measures to protect the environment through adequate sensitization and enforcement of environmental laws.

Keywords


disposal; effluents; method; milling; soil

Full Text:

PDF

References


Adewumi, J.R., Babatola, J.O. and Olayanju, O. 2016. The impact of cassava wastewater from starch processing industry on surrounding soil: A case study of Matna Foods industry, Ogbese. FUOYE Journal of Engineering and Technology 1(1): 31-36.

Adeyemo, O.K. 2005. Haematological and histopathological effects of cassava mill effluent in Clarias gariepinus. African Journal of Biomedical Research 8 (3): 179-183.

Bouyoucos, G.J. 1962. Improved hydrometer method for making particle size analysis. Agronomy Journal 54: 464-465.

Bremner, J.M. 1960. Determination of nitrogen in soil by the Kjeldahl method. Journal of Agricultural Science 55: 11-33.

Eze, V.C. and Onyilide, D.M. 2015. Microbiological and physicochemical characteristics of soil receiving cassava effluent in Elele, Rivers State, Nigeria. Journal of Applied & Environmental Microbiology 3(1): 20-24.

FEPA (Federal Environmental Protection Agency). 1991. Guidelines and Standards for Environmental Pollution in Nigeria.

Igbinosa, E.O. and Igiehon, O.N. 2015. The Impact of cassava effluent on the microbial and physicochemical characteristics on soil dynamics and structure. Jordan Journal of Biological Sciences 8(2): 107-112.

Khan, V,, Mariyum, A,, Pasha, N. and Hasnain, A. 2011. Impact of organization culture on the job satisfaction of the employees (banking sector of Pakistan). European Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Sciences (35): 8-14.

Khan, A.B. and Kathi, S. 2014. Evaluation of heavy metal and total petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of roadside surface soil. International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 11:2259–2270.

Kolawole, O.P. 2014. Cassava Processing and the Environmental Effect. Proceeding of the 4th World Sustainability Forum, MDPI Switzerland: 1-7.

Mahanta, M. and Bhattacharyya, K. 2011. Total concentrations, fractionation and mobility of heavy metals in soils of urban area of Guwahati, India. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 173:221–240.

Malik, R.N., Husain, S.Z. and Nazir, I. 2010. Heavy metal contamination and accumulation in soil and wild plant species from industrial area of Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Botany 42: 123-127.

Nelson, D.W. and Sommers, L.E. 1982. Total carbon, organic carbon, and organic matter, in Methods of Soil Analysis: 539–594.

Okonkwo, J.O. and Mothiba M. 2005. Physico-chemical characteristics and pollution levels of heavy metals in the rivers in Thohoyandou, South Africa. Journal of Hydrology 308:122-127.

Onyeike, E.N., Ogbuja, S.I. and Nwinuka, N.M. 2002. Inorganic ion levels of soils and streams in some areas of Ogoniland, Nigeria as affected by crude oil spillage. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 73(2): 191–204.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Indexed By